The End of Mr Y by Scarlett Thomas

There are some books you read where you know incredibly swiftly that you absolutely LOVE them. You get about a quarter of the way through and find yourself totally entranced by just how much you’re enjoying every single page, but it’s an entrancement mixed with a kind of niggling dread where you whisper to the…

Die A Little by Megan Abbott

It’s a hell of a debut for Megan Abbott: a female led mystery in 1940's Hollywood with a distinctly unreliable narrator. There’s murder, a femme-fatale and a too trusting dope of a man. But it feels like Abbott is referencing women’s films of the 1940s, as much as she is standard noir. As if she…

The Devil in the White City by Eric Larson

After East-End Jack, the only other Victorian serial killer people could name would probably be H.H. Holmes. The curious American doctor who built a crazy house in Chicago with gas chambers, hidden rooms and a furnace too big and too powerful for domestic use. So it’s somewhat bizarre that even though Holmes was caught and…

The Dark Tower by Stephen KIng

Dear Stephen. First let me say, thank you. I’ve finally come to the end of the road to The Dark Tower and I just wanted to express my thanks for the path travelled. I’ll be honest with you, it was a path I resisted for years and years. In my childhood I had a bad…

Angel of the Abyss by Ed Kurtz

Undoubtedly, it’s because I read too much Raymond Chandler when I was young, before moving on to read too much James Ellroy, but the sub-genre I love most is probably the Hollywood-set murder mystery/thriller. What I find so fascinating is the mixture of that impossible Technicolor glamour, with tawdry and brutal crime. It’s the tearing…

Song of Susannah by Stephen King

In anticipation of the film coming out, here - week by week - are my reviews of THE DARK TOWER novels. Here's a question: Does Stephen King writing himself as a character into the penultimate episode of THE DARK TOWER make it more or less epic? Mid-way through, our heroes Roland and Eddie find themselves…

Into the Wild by John Krakauer

The book of INTO THE WILD feels exactly like what it is: a magazine article blown up large to fill a book. Perhaps fitting for a story about a wanderer, Krakauer heads off on all kinds of diversions and detours from the main story, some of them are interesting and add to the reader’s understanding,…

Wizard and Glass by Stephen King

In anticipation of the film coming out, here - week by week - are my reviews of THE DARK TOWER novels. Coming off the forward momentum of THE WASTE LAND, this wasn’t the book I was expecting. But then, is that necessarily a bad thing? Surely part an author’s job should be to subvert expectations,…